Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo #2020

Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo By Plato G.M.A. Grube John M. Cooper Five Dialogues Euthyphro Apology Crito Meno Phaedo The second edition of Five Dialogues presents G M A Grube s distinguished translations as revised by John Cooper for Plato Complete Works Hacket Cooper has also contributed a number of new or

  • Title: Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo
  • Author: Plato G.M.A. Grube John M. Cooper
  • ISBN: 9780872206335
  • Page: 167
  • Format: Paperback
  • Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo By Plato G.M.A. Grube John M. Cooper The second edition of Five Dialogues presents G M A Grube s distinguished translations, as revised by John Cooper for Plato, Complete Works Hacket, 1997 Cooper has also contributed a number of new or expanded footnotes and updated Suggestions for Further Reading.
    Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo By Plato G.M.A. Grube John M. Cooper

    • [PDF] Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo | by ☆ Plato G.M.A. Grube John M. Cooper
      167 Plato G.M.A. Grube John M. Cooper

    About "Plato G.M.A. Grube John M. Cooper"

    1. Plato G.M.A. Grube John M. Cooper

      Greek Arabic Alternate Spelling Plat n, Platone Plato is a Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science.Plato is one of the most important Western philosophers, exerting influence on virtually every figure in philosophy after him His dialogue The Republic is known as the first comprehensive work on political philosophy Plato also contributed foundationally to ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology His student, Aristotle, is also an extremely influential philosopher and the tutor of Alexander the Great of Macedonia.

    726 thoughts on “Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo”

    1. Who wouldn t love a series of dialogs from a smartass who walked around Athens asking people irritating questions until they finally decided to kill him In all seriousness though, what I really identified with in this book is not so much the actual philosophy of Socrates, but his insistence on making people think about their beliefs and opinions.


    2. All of the Platonic dialogues in this book come together to form something of a narrative of the trial and last days of the famous philosopher Socrates Covering topics that range from piety, truth, virtue and even the nature of the soul and the afterlife this is a good collection to get started in an investigation of the figure of Socrates and his depiction by his most famous pupil Plato Euthyphro On his way to the Athenian law courts to face charges of impiety and the corruption of the youth of [...]


    3. These dialogues contain the core concepts of Platonic philosophy and serve as a good introduction to the legacy of Socrates and philosophy in the golden age of Greece I ve read these dialogues probably a dozen times in my life and discover something new with each read.



    4. Reread Apology, Crito and Phaedo for a weekend seminar at St John s College These dialogues are the account of Socrates trial, his refusal of his friends offer to help him escape from Athens, and his last day, spent discussing the immortality of the soul There are at least three strands to these dialogues the philosophic arguments, myths, and the testimony of Socrates own character Impossible to read without being moved, inspired and challenged.


    5. Dialogues taken from around the time of Socrates death I picked up this book wanting to understand about the thinking of Socrates and the progressions of logical thought My only previous introduction to the Socratic Method was from pop culture references and its abysmal application in public education.Apology, Crito and Phaedo all center upon Socrates trial, personal philosophy and final conversation respectively and, while interesting from an academic point of view, I did not find them very he [...]


    6. One of the those it s a bit impertinent to review People have been reviewing Socrates and Plato for 2,500 years, and I doubt I have much to add.Suffice it to say, this is a particularly beautiful work of philosophy The five dialogues here collected all hover around Socrates death In Euthyphro, Socrates is preparing for his trial, in Apology he is addressing the jury, in Crito, he is on death row, Meno appears in this collection like a flashback, where we see Socrates offend Anytus, who ends up b [...]


    7. I read three out of five dialogues Apology, Crito, Meno All three dialogues were profoundly beautifully written, but Apology affected me the most It made me question my principles that were supposed to be unwavering and eternal If anyone can make death seem graceful, it s Socrates It also made me angry How can a man act so calmly and almost insouciantly when incompetent subjective men play God with his life I almost felt offended that a man so hungry for knowledge didn t truly realize the value [...]


    8. In the first of the dialogues Euthyphro and Socrates try to discuss and define allegiance Euthyphro charges his father of murder of one of his workers as Socrates is also being charged with impiety he hopes to learn a thing or two from Euthyphro in hopes that he can use it in his own trial.Apology is Plato s version of Socrates s speech at his trial in his own defense he allegedly had a thing for creating a whole bunch of new deities without worshiping or believing in the gods everyone else did [...]


    9. One way to appreciate philosophy is to prioritise questions to answers Answers are often product o the local culture, and so tend to be parochial This becomes very evident when examining a distant culture The answers will lack credibility, or even coherence This is a humbling experience, when we consider how foolish our own answers will appear to others, say, in the distant future A good philosophical question has great reach Matters that occupied Socrates remain present concerns It is not to mu [...]


    10. I read this book for my university philosophy class in my freshman or sopho year It was my first approach to Plato and Socrates I did feel like I was sitting just outside the circle of listeners as the debates raged on I think my favourite discourse here was Apology where Socrates stands his ground as a philosopher who will not water down his message despite the threats against him by the status quo We definitely need like him right now given the current political climate The other dialogues ar [...]


    11. I remember having to read this for a Philosophy course I m not sure if I ever finished it, but I recall it being interesting and thought provoking.





    12. Euthyphro Apology Crito Meno Phaedo Apology Phaedo Euthyphro Euthyphro E Piety E Apology Crito Crito Crito Meno Meno Virtue Phaedo Phaedo 59b Crito Cebes Simmias 60d 61c 61e willing and ready to die 62d Cebes other wise and good gods expect to join a company of good men 64c 65b the soul reasons best when none of these senses troubles it, neither hearing nor sight, nor pain nor please, but when it is most by itself, taking leave of the body and as far as possible having no contact or association [...]


    13. Summary Plato s Five Dialogues includes essays which recount the days leading up to Socrates trial for corrupting the youths of Athens , as well as Socrates defense apologia to the jury, and his final conversation with his closest friends before his induced suicide by hemlock The essays are an exploration of the man and his methods, as well as an historical account by Plato of the time period and its dangers during the transition from oligarchy to democracy there was a tension between the govern [...]


    14. Plato s writing is beautiful in contrast to other philosophers like Kant s, as my Greek Philosophy professor put it Euthyphro and Meno were particularly interesting Although I think Socrates ideas are full of inconsistencies and reflect a rather primitive understanding of psychology, knowledge, learning, and virtue, the questions Socrates asks are extremely interesting and thought provoking even though I find many of his answers to be pretty clearly wrong.


    15. Plato is brilliant he blows my mind I love that I can read these texts over and over again and still get something new out of each read With the exception of maybe the Republic, the Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo are my favorite Platonic masterpieces.







    16. I m not really able to review a text like this the concept of doing so seems quite strange What I can say about it though, is that it s a lot readable than I was expecting Plato is an excellent writer, and these dialogues flow well and are entertaining I feared before I began reading them that these dialogues could have been a chore to read they are not They are straightforward and engaging.Although I add a caveat to the above, there is perhaps one part which is not straightforward and engaging [...]


    17. Both playing catch up and preparing for independent study class upcoming Spring 18 semester, I began Five Dialogues as soon as Fall 17 semester ended I expected to be challenged and intellectually stretched I did not expect to be moved This contains some of the dialogues leading up to Socrates death, and his defense at trial Apology before his sentenced suicide by hemlock Very enriching read.


    18. I ve had this book since 2005 so I thought it s about time I finally read it After doing so, I can see why the citizens of Athens had had enough of Socrates, as the dude does not shut up I was actually expecting a lot of aphorisms but didn t encounter many Phaedo is the best of the bunch and that s probably because it has a lot of Plato speaking on behalf of Socrates.The preface is necessary reading to understand the context in which the work was written.


    19. I mourn the death of such a sweet, bearded philosopher, whose only crime was teaching children to question the world around them and stating the uselessness of politicians He chose to die as the state willed him to die, and passed from the world via hemlock.



    20. Only read Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, and little bit of Meno Throughly interesting and deep thoughts provoked on what is justice, piety, etc.


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